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3,000 families in Jawzjan have no access to clean water

3,000 families in Jawzjan have no access to clean water

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On
Mar 08, 2011 - 17:25

SHIBERGHAN (PANinfo-icon): About 3,000 families in three villages in northern Jawzjan province have no access to drinking water, residents said on Tuesday.

People from Saltuq, Mangjak and Qazal Ayaq villages of Khwaja Dukoh district say they will be forced to leave the area unless the government resolves the water supply problem.

Jawzjan governor, Mohammad Alam Saee, said the issue would be solved in the new year, which starts on March 21.

A resident of Quzal Ayaq village, Khairullah, 52, said they were taking drinking water from natural pools, which were not clean, and then suffering from bacterial diseases.

Several times, people had complained to the district and provincial authorities about the lack of water, but no action had been taken, he said.

Qamar, 34, a resident of Mangjak village, said: “My daughter has been very sick since last night. She is vomiting and so I took her to a doctor.”

Qamar said the water in the well of their village was bitter, salty and undrinkable. “We drink water from the pool,” she said.

“We have been drinking this water for years and most of us have fallen ill,” she added.

Hashima, head of Quzqol Ayaq village clinic, said the people mostly drank stagnant water from the natural pools, which caused a variety of diseases such as diarrhea, amoebic dysentery, kidney stones, cholera and malaria.

She sees 50 to 60 patients a day, 80 percent of whom are womeninfo-icon and 20 percent men.

Khwaja Du Koh district chief, Gowhar Khan Babari, said it cost about 10 afghanis (20 US cents) for one jerry can of drinking water from the district centre, and that many people could not afford even that.

am/cas

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