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    Young man develops Afghan Messenger

    KABUL (PAN): A young Afghan, Hafez Nasratullah Albi, says he has developed software called Afghan Messenger, which is more advanced than the Yahoo and other versions.

    The 26-year-old told Pajhwok Afghan News during an exclusive interview that he had developed the messenger so that his countrymen could use their own social connectivity tool.

    The Afghan Messenger will have more options and facilities than other versions, Albi claimed, explaining it had a special system -- Online Teacher -- for those who cannot go to universities.

    Another unique option of the messenger is access to thousands of online radio stations, which people could easily tune into by just getting online, Albi added.

    He said: "There is an option in the messenger to choose online radio programmes, comment on them and leave messages. There is no need for phone use in this regard."

    The man said up to 20 people could have a video conference, using other messengers, but his version has the capacity for 100,000 people to have a similar conference simultaneously.

    "If the messenger is put to use, it will have the capacity of 10 million IDs in one year." He believed the software cannot be hacked. He sent its database to hackers, who could not hack the software.

    The Afghan Messenger could not only compete with other messengers, but could work better, he asserted. He wants to dedicate the messenger to the Afghan government and people, though it could be sold to private companies at a very high price.

    "My financial situation is not as good as to let me buy other required tools for it. If the government provides me a special server with a 24-hour Internet facility and advanced computer systems, the software will serve millions of people."

    He invited other Afghan computer an information technology experts to team up with him in giving the nation a messenger of its own. He reminded of banking software named Nasrat Wardak Accounting (NWA).

    "I also developed Simple Accounting for currency conversion. As it was welcomed by companies and moneychangers, I was encouraged to develop the second software NWA."

    Simple Accounting that can convert 175 currencies at a time is also useful for moneychangers, private commercial firms, banks and shops. The man said he had come to Afghanistan from Egypt to promote his software.

    The son of Eng. Mohammad Rahim, he was born in 1986 in the Ambukhak village of Chak district in central Wardak province.  He received primary education in the village before getting admission to the Abdul Hai High School in Gardez.

    For higher education, he went to Iran, Turkey and other Arab countries. He specialises in banking and computer engineering.  He was 15 year-old when he learnt the Holy Quran by heart at the Bilal bin Rabah Quran Memorisation Centre in Gardez.

    Currently, he is the manager of Kite Software Team in Egypt and has so far developed eight software versions.

    mbg/mud