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49,000 girl students enrolled in Kabul-based religious schools

49,000 girl students enrolled in Kabul-based religious schools

Feb 24, 2016 - 20:23

KABULinfo-icon (Pajhwok): The number of religious schools for girls is on the rise in Kabul, where the Ministry of Hajjinfo-icon and Religious Affairs (MoHRA) is keeping a close watch on them, an official said on Wednesday.

Statistics from the ministry show 104 girls’ madrasas were attended by more than 40,000 students last year. But the number of the religious schools increased to 120 and that of students to more than 49,000 in 2016.

MoHRA spokesman Daye-ul-Haq Abid told Pajhwok Afghan News the madrasas were registered and provided curriculum by the ministry. The curriculum includes learning rules, Arabic, Quraninfo-icon memorization and translation, as well as Islamic jurisprudence.

Salaries of teachers are donated by locals and organisations across the Muslim worldinfo-icon, particularly Turkey-based institutions, Abid said, adding local prayer leaders taught students for free.

Shaesta, a student of the Irshad-ul-Quran madrasa in the eighth police district, said she had been learningtranslation of the holy book, jurisprudence, recitation, tajweed and Arabic language for the past three years.

She has a special interest in getting Islamic educationinfo-icon and decided to serve the Muslims by providing them religious knowledge.

Also studying the Sharia law at a private university, Shaesta asked girls to receive Islamic education to counter the impact of cultural wars and proselytising campaigns in Afghanistaninfo-icon.

“Some groups involved in extremism have recently emerged in the city. But Islam is not a religion of terrorism and prefers balance and moderation,” she remarked.

The rising number of girls’enrollmentin seminariesshows their keen interest in protection of Islam’s glory and Afghan cultural values, she observed.

Matiullah Safi, the manager of Al-Falah Girls Madrasa where 12,000 students are receiving Islamic education, said 1,500 pupils had graduated from the seminary so far.

He said currently 4,500 other female students were being taught by 67 teachers at his madrasa. Safi added 14 subjects including Arabic, Quran memorisation and translation, as well as Islamic, jurisprudence, were taught at the madrasa.

Al-Falah Madrasa also offers primary education, tailoring training for womeninfo-icon and a kindergarten. “Graduate from our madrasa can continue higher education and serve as teachers at schools under the Ministry of Education (MoE).”

But Safi said they had no proper building for students, who were often harassed on streets.He added some girls were discouraged by their families not to get religious education.

“Some girls are told by their families to quit higher education. Their relatives argue girls cannot find jobs and should, therefore, quit higher education,” he said. However, after graduating from the madrasagirls can get a job and earn enough to resolve their problems.

However, MoHRA spokesman said they were carefully assessing the seminary education process to prevent any practice that violated the law and Islamic values.A number of madrasas for girls are registered with the Ministry of Education.

MoE spokesman Mujbi Mehrdad said around 42,000 female students were attending 48 madrasas. All such schools are registered with the ministry. The madrasa curriculum is prepared by MoE and evaluated by religious and audit departments of the ministry.

Some owners do not register their seminaries with the ministry but such madaris were also under the government’s control to prevent them from inculcating extremist ideas into the students, he concluded.


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